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Top UK medical school launches new Sri Lankan route to medical career


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Aspiring doctors in Sri Lanka and the region can, for the first time gain a degree in medicine at one of the best medical schools in the UK whilst completing the final clinical years of their studies in Sri Lanka.

Professor Alan Denison – Deputy Director – Institute 

of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen

The University of Aberdeen, Scotland, has launched the new Sri Lanka Medical Pathway which will see Sri Lankan students spend three years studying in Scotland and the final clinical years working in hospitals in Sri Lanka.

The new initiative will give Sri Lankan and regional medical students a unique opportunity to gain experience working in two healthcare systems.

Founded in 1495, the University of Aberdeen is the fifth oldest university in the UK. Aberdeen’s medicine program was recently ranked the best in Scotland and fourth in the UK. Overall, the University is ranked within the Top 30 in the UK and Top 160 in the world.

The first to third years are delivered in Aberdeen, on one of the largest health campuses in Europe, by experienced clinicians at the forefront of modern clinical practice and research.

There are opportunities to apply for summer research scholarships and in final year to spend eight weeks studying abroad.The fourth to fifth years will be spent in Sri Lanka, facilitated by the International Institute of Health Sciences (IIHS) where students will be supported by Sri Lankan-based University of Aberdeen staff. 

Graduates will receive a University of Aberdeen MBChB degree, which is a primary medical qualification (PMQ), which currently entitles graduates to apply for provisional registration with the UK General Medical Council.

University of Aberdeen Principal and Vice-Chancellor Professor George Boyne said: “Throughout our history, stretching more than 520 years, the University has taken pride in being open to the world and this new Sri Lankan Medical Pathway is another example of us continuing this philosophy today. We look forward to welcoming students from Sri Lanka and the region to join our highly respected medicine program in Aberdeen, before they return to Sri Lanka where they will be supported by our talented staff as they complete the final years of their studies.” 

University of Aberdeen Institute for Education in Medical and Dental Sciences Director Professor Roney Patey added: “We’re so excited to be launching this new program which will give Sri Lankan and regional students the best of both worlds – the chance to study at one of the most respected medical schools in the UK, and also the chance to complete their clinical years of study in hospitals in Sri Lanka. 

“The quality of degree that we offered is recognised around the world and the chance to welcome more international students will further increase the diversity of our student pool which will benefit them all throughout their studies.”

Thilanee Vijayakumar from Sri Lanka is currently in her fifth year of medicine at the University of Aberdeen. She said she “couldn’t have asked for a better choice” than Aberdeen.“The people are extremely friendly and helpful. It’s such a pleasure to be around such amiable folks. The city is absolutely gorgeous with a very convenient transport system and most places are within walking distance. It’s been a pleasure living and studying here. 

“I really enjoy the scenic views of Scotland. I’ve been doing a lot of hiking and cycling since I’ve come here. Also I quite enjoy dancing and basketball so I signed up for the classes offered by other university students. It has been a great way to meet new people.

“I would definitely encourage others from Sri Lankan and elsewhere to come and study medicine here. The course really prepares you for life as a junior doctor. I particularly admire how much importance is placed on communication skills, as it is extremely important to be able to communicate effectively with your patients. 

“I feel that the course was very well structured, lecturers were very good at emphasising on the important clinical knowledge and we’ve had many clinical skills sessions focusing on patient communication and always had very constructive feedback. I am planning to do my Foundation Years in Scotland and then, who knows!”

Anyone interested in further information about the Sri Lankan Medical Pathway at the University of Aberdeen,

Visit – www.abdn.ac.uk/sri-lanka/ 

Contact – +44 (0) 1224 437923/+9476 3422 446 


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