Home / Technology/ 5 ways winning startups tackle tough growth constraints

5 ways winning startups tackle tough growth constraints


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Friday, 29 April 2016 00:00


www.entrepreneur.com: There is nothing wrong with growing your business by selling more of your solution to more people in more cities, states, and countries. That’s called organic growth, and everybody does it. But in my experience as a startup advisor, too many entrepreneurs get stuck there, and always find excuses for not really exploring mergers, acquisitions, partnerships, and alliance alternatives.

Excuses for not thinking outside the box usually include limited personal bandwidth, not enough cash, and fear of the unknown. All of these are real, but the best entrepreneurs find these no more daunting than the challenges they face every day, and find time to work on the business, as well as working in the business. Here are the key steps recommended to keep you growing:

1. Identify the single biggest current constraint on growth

For example, at any given moment in your business, you may be limited by development, marketing, or sales. The organic solution is to hire more people, spend more money, and ramp up your focus. But finding money and hiring more people always takes longer than expected – slow growth.

2. Evaluate outsourcing as a quick solution to break the constraint

These days, there are many companies around the world, with the skills and equipment you need, ready to assist with development resources, marketing programs, or call centers immediately. Of course, they all prefer cash, but some may work for future revenue or startup equity.

3. Investigate strategic alliance alternatives

An example of a good strategic alliance was Barnes & Noble bringing Starbucks into their book stores. It was a win-win deal, with new customers and better service for both. Startups can use alliances just as well to get to new customer segments, block competitors, or gain credibility from the logo of others.

4. Acquire or merge with another company

Acquiring another startup with a strong development team may be far faster and cheaper than building your own, and can be an equity exchange rather than cash. Mergers and acquisitions can also be win-win, if you have customers they need for a product complimentary to yours. Think outside the box.

5. Negotiate a 

“co-opetition” deal with a competitor

Win-win deals with competitors are always possible, for example, to reduce costs of a common component, to penetrate new markets, set industry standards, or share a sales channel. Just keep your customer’s best interest as your first priority, and resist the urge to kill every competitor.

Smart entrepreneurs make these five steps an iterative process and a way of life, attacking one growth constraint after another. Of course, it’s important to maintain a balance of organic growth versus the more creative approaches. Total reliance on partners and acquisitions may de-motivate internal teams, or increase your vulnerability to conflicts of interest or partner control.

The smart approach is to nurture a pipeline of growth alternatives and relationships, similar to your customer acquisition pipeline. This requires that you maintain at least a minimum business development focus and skill set inside your own organisation to keep these options on the table. Business development must maintain that balance between internal and external growth options.


Share This Article


DISCLAIMER:

1. All comments will be moderated by the Daily FT Web Editor.

2. Comments that are abusive, obscene, incendiary, defamatory or irrelevant will not be published.

3. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.

4. Kindly use a genuine email ID and provide your name.

5. Spamming the comments section under different user names may result in being blacklisted.

COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

In the desert of Tamil films, actor Sivaji Ganesan was an oasis

Saturday, 22 September 2018

‘Indian Film,’ first published in 1963 and co-authored by former Columbia University Professor Erik Barnouw and his student Dr. Subrahmanyam Krishnaswamy, is considered a seminal study of the evolution and growth of Indian cinema. The book is cit


Imran may turn blind eye to blasphemy law and persecution of Ahmadiyyas

Saturday, 22 September 2018

There are clear signs that Pakistan’s freshly minted Prime Minister, Imran Khan, will make a sincere effort to reduce corruption and maladministration in the domestic sphere. In foreign affairs he is likely to make a brave attempt to mend fences wi


The rate of exchange, capital flight and the Central Bank

Friday, 21 September 2018

The Central Bank (CBSL) exists for the sole purpose of price stability. Its controls on the financial system and monetary policy exist to maintain price stability. As put forth many times by the Governor, the failing of the CBSL to control inflation


Red flag over the Sri Lankan Navy

Friday, 21 September 2018

Shocking story Rusiripala, a former banker in Sri Lanka, who has taken to writing in Daily FT, is perturbed by the red flag I have raised (Daily FT article 18 September) over the shocking charge that our Navy had operated a ransom gang that had abduc


Columnists More