Home / Shipping / Aviation/ IMO works to clamp down on illicit shipping practices

IMO works to clamp down on illicit shipping practices


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Monday, 8 April 2019 00:00

Facebook

Zacarias Pereira da Mata

LONDON (Reuters): The United Nations’ shipping agency is working on tougher measures to clamp down on rogue shipping companies trying to use flag registries fraudulently to conceal their activities, officials said. 

All commercial ships have to be registered – flagged in a particular country – partly to comply with safety and environmental laws. 

With international and US sanctions imposed on countries including North Korea, Iran and Syria, some ships involved in such trade have used tactics to sidestep the measures including turning off their location transponders and falsely reporting their flag registry, also to secure insurance. 

Drug and weapon smuggling are among other areas of trade in which front companies attempt to conceal their activities to avoid being detected. 

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) agreed on a series of measures after a committee session last week which included the creation of a comprehensive database of registries and ways to improve information on the illegal registration of ships, the IMO said. 

Other recommendations included enhanced verification of vessels through their unique IMO numbers and adherence to the requirement for an onboard record of a ship’s history. 

The IMO will also work with the UN Security Council to create a searchable database that would show vessels subject to UN resolutions. The work is expected to be completed in 2021. 

“Experience has shown that the raison d’tre of fraudulent registries is to conceal illicit activity on board vessels, including activities prohibited by United Nations sanctions,” the United States said in one submission to the IMO. 

Multiple countries have reported to the IMO that their registries had been used without the knowledge of the maritime authority for fraudulent purposes through fake documents or even maintaining the flag after it had been terminated.

 


Share This Article

Facebook Twitter


DISCLAIMER:

1. All comments will be moderated by the Daily FT Web Editor.

2. Comments that are abusive, obscene, incendiary, defamatory or irrelevant will not be published.

3. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.

4. Kindly use a genuine email ID and provide your name.

5. Spamming the comments section under different user names may result in being blacklisted.

COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

Eradicating ‘educated terrorists’ virus with medicine of education via good character capsule

Wednesday, 17 July 2019

The whole world was traumatised on 21 April by the tragic events in Sri Lanka; many ‘educated terrorists’ had decided to walk into churches and luxury hotels in Sri Lanka and blow themselves up. The attack took the lives of more than 250 people.


An aborted university and squandered opportunity

Wednesday, 17 July 2019

About three years ago when passing through Punanai along the arterial road between Habarana and Batticaloa, I noticed a few brick structures appearing in a parched land amid thick shrubs and woody trees. It was almost a desolate spot where I could no


The delineations of religions, politics and media

Wednesday, 17 July 2019

In Ashoka’s Edicts, it is rightfully stated, “Never think or say your religion is the best. Never denounce the religion of others. But honour in them whatever is worthy of honour.” [It is widely believed Ashoka the Great was the first leader t


The good karma of being dark

Wednesday, 17 July 2019

“The memoir of an unrepentant dark-skinned girl, a misfit who fitted in, a juggler of home and work, who thanks to her good karma escaped relatively unbruised. Still unsure why she stubbornly refuses to conform. But as you flip through these pages


Columnists More