Home / Other Sectors/ India set to outlaw six single-use plastic products on 2 October

India set to outlaw six single-use plastic products on 2 October


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Saturday, 31 August 2019 00:05


A volunteer collects garbage as he cleans a beach in Mumbai, India 

- Reuters

 

New Delhi (Reuters): India is set to impose a nationwide ban on plastic bags, cups and straws on 2 October, officials said, in its most sweeping measure yet to stamp out single-use plastics from cities and villages that rank among the world’s most polluted.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who is leading efforts to scrap such plastics by 2022, is set to launch the campaign with a ban on as many as six items on 2 October, the birth anniversary of independence leader Mahatma Gandhi, two officials said.

These include plastic bags, cups, plates, small bottles, straws and certain types of sachets, said the officials, who asked not to be identified, in line with government policy.

“The ban will be comprehensive and will cover manufacturing, usage and import of such items,” one official said.

India’s environment and housing ministries, the two main ministries leading the drive, did not respond to emails from Reuters to seek comment.

In an Independence Day speech on 15 August, Modi had urged people and government agencies to “take the first big step” on 2 October towards freeing India of single-use plastic.

Concerns are growing worldwide about plastic pollution, with a particular focus on the oceans, where nearly 50% of single-use plastic products end up, killing marine life and entering the human food chain, studies show.

The European Union plans to ban single-use plastic items such as straws, forks, knives and cotton buds by 2021.

China’s commercial hub of Shanghai is gradually reining in use of single-use plastics in catering, and its island province of Hainan has already vowed to completely eliminate single-use plastic by 2025.

India lacks an organised system for management of plastic waste, leading to widespread littering across its towns and cities.

The ban on the first six items of single-use plastics will clip 5% to 10% from India’s annual consumption of about 14 million tonnes of plastic, the first official said.

Penalties for violations of the ban will probably take effect after an initial six-month period to allow people time to adopt alternatives, officials said.

Some Indian states have already outlawed polythene bags.

The federal government also plans tougher environmental standards for plastic products and will insist on the use of recyclable plastic only, the first source said.

It will also ask e-commerce companies to cut back on plastic packaging that makes up nearly 40% of India’s annual plastic consumption, officials say.

Cheap smartphones and a surge in the number of internet users have boosted orders for e-commerce companies, such as Amazon Inc. and Walmart Inc.’s Flipkart, which wrap their wares - from books and medicines to cigarettes and cosmetics - in plastic, pushing up consumption.


Share This Article

Facebook Twitter


DISCLAIMER:

1. All comments will be moderated by the Daily FT Web Editor.

2. Comments that are abusive, obscene, incendiary, defamatory or irrelevant will not be published.

3. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.

4. Kindly use a genuine email ID and provide your name.

5. Spamming the comments section under different user names may result in being blacklisted.

COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

Forensic Audits part of bond scam cover-up

Saturday, 25 January 2020

From the time the bond scam was carried out by the Ranil Wickremesinghe administration, that administration under the guidance of the former Prime Minister had been avoiding the law by regularly bringing up various distractions so that the true natur


Halting mega projects is untimely; Govt. can explore other options

Friday, 24 January 2020

In a Sunday newspaper on 5 January a news item titled ‘Mega projects on hold until August budget,’ ‘Drop in revenue after tax reductions prevents spending on major constructions,’ was not a development-friendly headline. It may be accurate o


Is any further expenditure on the Port City a waste of money?

Friday, 24 January 2020

Erase from the mind all that you have read and heard about it. Then take a blank piece of paper, draw an irregular circle, and draw a line to divide it into two. On the bottom half write 300 acres. That is our Port City! To get the size into a proper


Foundations of incivility

Friday, 24 January 2020

The lack of advanced political consciousness and democratic discipline can be considered as one of the main reasons for the crisis and the failure that Sri Lanka is facing. This can be considered a situation that has prevailed since independence. Sri


Columnists More