Home / Marketing/ German fans less aware of sponsors but will spend more

German fans less aware of sponsors but will spend more


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Wednesday, 13 June 2018 09:00

Facebook

BERLIN (Reuters): German soccer fans will spend more on World Cup memorabilia, including Adidas replica shirts, than during the 2014 tournament, although official FIFA sponsorship is losing its impact, a survey published on Wednesday (6 June) said.

Germans are prepared to spend about EUR 22.75 ($26.89) on average for World Cup products, up from just EUR 11.26 during the tournament in Brazil, according to a poll of 1,000 people conducted by Hohenheim University in Stuttgart.

National team jerseys made by Adidas are top of fans’ shopping lists, followed by German flags, hats, balls, scarves and beer, while branded World Cup products such as watches and bed linen are much less popular, the survey showed.

Adidas, which is an official sponsor of the tournament, and is kitting-out 12 of the 32 participating teams, says it expects to sell more shirts this year than the 8 million it sold in 2014, including 1 million in the United States.

However, formal sponsorship of the FIFA World Cup is losing its potency. Only 40% of those surveyed know that Adidas and Coca-Cola are FIFA partners, down from more than 60% and more than 50% respectively in 2014.

For example, many fans think that Nike is an official sponsor because so many players wear its shoes. Daimler’s luxury car brand Mercedes is also perceived as a sponsor although it just supports the German national team.

“Many companies don’t bother with the official sponsorship logo and still manage to associate themselves with the World Cup just as effectively via national teams and football accessories,” said Hohenheim Marketing Professor Markus Voeth.

FIFA has been battered by a series of corruption scandals and struggled to find new top-tier sponsors after deals with Sony Corp and Emirates Airline expired at the end of 2014.

Nike expects that 60% of all the players heading to Russia will be wearing its boots, including almost half the German and Spanish team, and three-quarters of the Russians, even though they will be wearing Adidas shirts.

Nike, which only became heavily involved in soccer when the World Cup was played in the United States in 1994, is supplying shirts for 10 countries, including Brazil, France and England.

 


Share This Article

Facebook Twitter


DISCLAIMER:

1. All comments will be moderated by the Daily FT Web Editor.

2. Comments that are abusive, obscene, incendiary, defamatory or irrelevant will not be published.

3. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.

4. Kindly use a genuine email ID and provide your name.

5. Spamming the comments section under different user names may result in being blacklisted.

COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

Shanta Devarajan: Economist who cannot get disconnected from his motherland

Monday, 19 August 2019

For me, Shanta Devarajan, formerly the Acting Chief Economist of the World Bank Group succeeding the Nobel Laureate Paul Romer and presently Professor at Georgetown University, USA, was a legend by himself. When I met him in early part of the new mil


Vibrancy of ‘Vijayaba Kollaya’: Lucid lessons for Lankans

Monday, 19 August 2019

I enjoyed watching the first 3D Sinhala movie last week. It is ‘Vijayaba Kollaya’ directed by Emeritus Professor Sunil Ariyarathne. It happened to be the last screenplay written by late Dr. Tissa Abeysekara. The story is based on a classical nove


Does legality matter at all?

Monday, 19 August 2019

There has been a recent flurry of media attention paid to the potential candidacy of Gotabaya Rajapaksa as the candidate of the Pohottuwa group at the next Presidential Election. While his is obviously a very well-financed campaign if the demonstrati


Sri Lanka’s next President: let’s get it right this time

Monday, 19 August 2019

President Sirisena is a few months away from completing his tenure as the President of this country. Despite his ability to seek re-election, he is likely not to do so as his popularity has plumped ever since he was installed to the top most position


Columnists More

Special Report

SPECIAL REPORT MORE