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Larger number of Sri Lankans showing greater interest in elective cosmetic procedures


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Sri Lanka appears to be witnessing an increasing interest in elective cosmetic procedures as locals seek out methods to enhance their physical appearance to look and feel confident. 

This may vary from wanting to reduce signs of ageing, enhancing a feature they didn’t like, reducing acne, covering up other skin related issues, or even getting rid of a tattoo they never ended up liking. Whatever it may be, it’s an entirely personal choice.

“In the past five months since we opened our doors, we have noticed a significant and continually increasing number of requests from clients, particularly for laser hair removal, laser facial rejuvenation, PRP for hair and face, radio frequency skin tightening, botox and fillers. Even though all these procedures are typically elective and are based on different individual’s preferences, these numbers reflect the increasing confidence that Sri Lankans feel in the ability of elective cosmetic surgeries to enhance how they look and feel overall.

“This may indicate that the stigma surrounding this particular field of medicine is dissolving to the point where minor elective procedures are viewed with greater acceptance and understanding, and generally less negatively than they would have been even five years previously,” stated Ninewells Hospital Director Dr. Thiasha Fernando.

While this development may seem surprising to some, given that cosmetic surgery is generally considered to be a recent Western import to regional culture, the history of cosmetic surgery is actually fundamentally linked to the Asian region. Historical records indicate that Eastern medicine has long held a place for cosmetic surgery as far back as 800 BCE.

It was at this time that the very first skin grafts and reconstructive surgeries were performed by an ancient Indian Physician named Sushruta, who pioneered his techniques after working to soothe the increasingly devastating effects of war on both soldiers and civilians.

Gradually these techniques were used to correct conditions like birth deformities or accident-led defects, scar treatments, cauterization and other surgeries and treatments to improve the quality of life for those who would otherwise not have access to help.      

In that context, it is perhaps less surprising that this ancient legacy is still alive and well in Sri Lanka and across the South Asian region even today. Equipped with cutting-edge technology by the world-leading brand for laser technology – ‘Lumenis,’ the Aesthetic and Cosmetic Centre by Ninewells, has already made waves as the holder of the most advance technology for Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetology in Sri Lanka. 

ACC by Ninewells is also the first and only holder of the NuEra Tight Machine by Lumenis in the country as well as Asia, which addresses issues such as skin tightening, face and body contouring and cellulite reduction.

With a luxurious ambiance and dedicated space on the 10th floor of Ninewells Hospital, the centre is led by high-skilled and experienced consultants, surgeons, medical officers and support staff to offer a range of surgical and non-surgical treatments.

Their surgical offerings include facial surgery solutions such as rhinoplasty, fat injections, and double chin reduction, cosmetic ear procedures, neck lifts, in addition to popular options like the ‘Mommy Makeover’; a range of treatments individually customised for moms who wish to get back to their pre pregnancy physique. The centre also offers body contouring procedures such as liposuction, calf and butt augmentation, and abdominoplasty, as well as gynae-cosmetic procedures. 

The centre’s non-surgical portfolio includes chemical peels, laser hair removal, botox, fillers, acne management, stretch mark treatment, tattoo/birth mark removal, micro needling, spider vein treatment, fat/cellulite reduction, cauterisation, laser facial rejuvenation and many more.

Ultimately, although aesthetic and cosmetic surgery can also contribute to a healthier and happier lifestyle, the irreplaceable benefits of a healthy diet and exercise can invariably improve mental well-being. Therefore being realistic about the ultimate goal of surgery and choosing the right ones with expert healthcare providers will definitely lead to the greatest benefits.

According to international medical studies, cosmetic surgery has been portrayed as a tool to help people feel better about their appearance. As such, aesthetic and cosmetic procedures are definitely tools that can help many improve and maintain mental and physical wellbeing hand in hand. 

Although an area of debate, societal trends have shown that people are more successful in their careers when they look attractive, feel good and therefore are more confident in their duties. Not only that, aesthetic surgery can have incredibly positive results when it comes to combatting growing pains such as anxiety, social phobia and even depression which may occur due to lack of self-confidence. 

She also added that the centre where these procedures are done places an extremely high value on privacy and client confidentiality, and has imposed multiple safeguards in order to ensure that they are protected at all times. Additionally, the centre also provides VIP services including exclusive Private Access facilities, over and above its 24/7 emergency support provided the most highly trained medical practitioners.


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