Home / Letters to the Editor/ How did Met. Dept. miss Cyclone Ockhi?

How did Met. Dept. miss Cyclone Ockhi?


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Monday, 4 December 2017 00:00


Most international weather sites warned of downpours in Sri Lanka and South India this week. Some said it may lead to flooding. Accuweather.com gave the warning titled “downpours return” on 23 November, saying rains would come to Sri Lanka and South India the following week. In fact Weather-forecast.com showed the expected path day by day of a depression. It currently shows another smaller depression east of Jaffna which is expected to move towards Chennai and disappear by 5 December.

By Monday 27 November there were many messages and emails about an impending storm and floods this week. However, on Tuesday, 28 November, a daily newspaper carried an article stating that the Department of Meteorology said these foreign forecasts could not be substantiated with the data available to the Meteorological Department. People accepted that and relaxed.

The deep depression intensified into a cyclone named Ockhi, there was heavy rain and strong winds, and people were caught by surprise. Now there is more “fake news” spreading, because the Met. Department has a credibility gap. Now more people will rely on foreign weather sites. All the warnings given by the Met. Department up to that time were of no avail because seeing the statement published in the newspaper, people did not expect such bad weather. 

Our Met. Department is doing its best. It must be further strengthened with the equipment and personnel they need. It must be guided to have a working website which people could easily access. A 10-day forecast is essential. I often speak to a very efficient lady in the Department who has substantially educated me on weather patterns and provides me information whenever I seek. They have the expertise and knowledge. It is better if such useful information is on their new website, and educates people on the weather probably using more illustrations. Their old website was old style but far easier to access.

Sunil G. Wijesinha Colombo 5.


Share This Article


DISCLAIMER:

1. All comments will be moderated by the Daily FT Web Editor.

2. Comments that are abusive, obscene, incendiary, defamatory or irrelevant will not be published.

3. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.

4. Kindly use a genuine email ID and provide your name.

5. Spamming the comments section under different user names may result in being blacklisted.

COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

Reinvent yourself before reinventing your industry

Tuesday, 23 October 2018

For the last 19 years Interbrand has been carrying out its Best Global Brands report. This year, the theme of the study is ‘Activating Brave’, which examines the role that brand strength plays in the transformation of the world’s leading busi


Virtual banks: Opportunities and challenges

Tuesday, 23 October 2018

A virtual bank is a bank which predominantly delivers retail banking services through the internet or other forms of electronic channels instead of physical branches. This covers all online transactions whether it be via the web, email, mobile check


Value of regulated landfills: Megapolis Ministry must communicate

Tuesday, 23 October 2018

Our policymakers may do the right thing but not do it too well by not communicating the larger purpose of their actions. The current fuss about the proposed Aruwakkalu landfill is one such example. As the Ministry of Megapolis correctly points out,


IPS’s State of the Economy Report 2018 is a demonstration of its independent analysis of the economy

Monday, 22 October 2018

Economists are at the receiving end of society today when it comes to economic crises. They have been blamed not only for giving confusing advice, but also for failing to predict accurately the oncoming economic catastrophes.


Columnists More