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Hong Kong police fires tear gas as protests descend into chaos


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Riot police fire tear gas, after a march to call for democratic reforms in Hong Kong, China - Reuters

HONG KONG (Reuters): Hong Kong police fired tear gas to disperse protesters in chaotic scenes late on Sunday as anger over an extradition bill morphs into a fresh front against what many see as a broader erosion of freedoms by the city’s political masters in Beijing.

Thousands of protesters descended on China’s representative office in the city, in a direct challenge to authorities in Beijing, just hours after the latest protest to rock the Asian financial central over the extradition bill.

Millions have taken to the streets in the past two months in an unprecedented show of force against Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, triggering the worst social turmoil to rock the former British colony since it returned to Chinese rule 22 years ago.

Black-clad activists, many wearing masks, defied police orders and marched beyond the official end-point of a rally that took place earlier in the day as they made their way towards the Liaison Office, in a direct challenge to authorities in Beijing.

When asked whether the protesters would attempt to force entry into the building, one 30-year-old man dressed head to toe in black said “No”, as he mimicked a throat-slitting action.

“That would be the death of Hong Kong,” he added.

Some protesters pelted eggs at the walls of the Liaison Office, while others spray-painted graffiti in the latest wave of demonstrations to rock the Asian financial centre.

Hundreds of riot police faced off with protesters, firing tear gas to disperse them as police and ambulance sirens echoed through the crowds.Activists had daubed graffiti on massive concrete pillars leading up to Beijing’s Liaison Office in the city, with the words “Restore Hong Kong, Revolution of Time”.

Sunday’s protest, which had proceeded peacefully along the police-mandated route, is the latest in a series of rallies that have plunged the Chinese-ruled city into political crisis.

Some held up banners that said, “LIAR” and “No excuse Carrie Lame”. A poster plastered on a lamppost called for an “Investigation on police brutality”.

More demonstrations are planned over the coming weekends, posing the greatest popular challenge to Chinese leader Xi Jinping since he took power in 2012. For Xi’s Communist Party in Beijing, stability is an overwhelming priority.

 


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