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Hong Kong leader says China ‘respects and supports’ withdrawal of extradition bill


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Friday, 6 September 2019 00:00


HONG KONG (Reuters): Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said on Thursday that China “understands, respects and supports” her government’s move to formally withdraw an extradition bill, part of measures she hoped would help the city “move forward” from months of unrest.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam



In a press conference, Lam was repeatedly questioned on why it took her so long to withdraw the bill that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China despite increasingly violent protests, but she skirted the questions.

“It is not exactly correct to describe this as a change of mind,” she said.

She added that full withdrawal of the bill was a decision made by her government with Beijing’s backing.

“Throughout the whole process, the Central People’s Government took the position that they understood why we have to do it. They respect my view, and they support me all the way,” said Lam, dressed in a cream suit and looking less tense than a televised appearance the day before.

She withdrew the bill, which has plunged the Chinese territory into its worst political crisis in decades, on Wednesday. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index surged more than 4% to a one-month high ahead of the announcement. On Thursday, the market was up 0.4% by midday.

Lam also announced other measures including opening a platform for dialogue with society to try to address other deep-rooted economic, social and political problems, including housing and mobility for young people, that she said were contributing to the current impasse.

“We must find ways to address the discontent in society and look for solutions,” she said. The withdrawal of the bill was one of the pro-democracy protesters’ five demands, although many demonstrators and lawmakers said the move was too little, too late.

The four other demands are retraction of the word “riot” to describe rallies, release of all demonstrators, an independent inquiry into perceived police brutality and the right for Hong Kong people to choose their own leaders.

Demonstrators were still calling for all demands to be met, with many placing emphasis on the independent inquiry. Lam said on Thursday that the independent police complaints council was credible enough to address the probe.

“We have all suffered from a humanitarian disaster caused by the government and police force,” said Wong, one of around 100 medical students protesting at Hong Kong University. Clad in gas masks, they formed a human chain shouting “Five demands, indispensable.” “Liberate Hong Kong, revolution of our time.”

Further protests are planned including on Saturday another “stress test” at the airport, which was targeted by protesters on Sunday leading to clashes with police on approach roads and in the nearby new town of Tung Chung.


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