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Challenges faced by LTTE ex-combatants


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Thursday, 9 April 2015 00:00

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A high percentage of those who are disabled are barred from engaging in employment activity. Lack of employment opportunities suitable with the vocational training received during rehabilitation. Lack of financial stability to buy tools and equipment required. Lack of willingness among ex-combatants to be employed in other areas away from their families. High demand for foreign employment or migration but lack of financial support and difficulties in obtaining visas and clearances. Resultant to forceful conscription of underage children by the LTTE, they have completely lost the human touch, social benefits and rights, which they are entitled to enjoy as human beings. Women and children has lost the respect within the community and are subjected to cultural vulnerability. Widows and disabled women within the community represent 25% of the reintegrated population. Culturally and socially they remain vulnerable at present. Hatred attitude shown by the community towards beneficiaries have created a stigma and they need to be protected from such vulnerability and isolation. Fear has engulfed them that even after dropping racial behaviour, they are being rejected including by children and immediate family members, which will eventually leads to psychological suffering. Needs identified
  •  Agriculture sector – seeds, plants and land for farming and fertiliser subsidy
  •  Animal husbandry
  •  Water and sanitation
  •  Land and housing
  •  Financial assistance for self-employment ex: micro financing initiatives
  •  Better education facilities
  •  Employment opportunities – e.g. garment factories, small industries
  •  Welfare services for disabled
  •  Fishing sector
  •  Empowerment of vulnerable women/men and children
  •  Health sector improvements
An action plan has been formulated to address the issues of the ex-combatants before 2020.

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