Home / Healthcare/ UNFPA marks Menstrual Hygiene Day in Sri Lanka

UNFPA marks Menstrual Hygiene Day in Sri Lanka


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Friday, 1 June 2018 00:00


Menstruation, colloquially known as ‘periods’, is a normal biological process. However, it remains a globally stigmatised issue, and many are reluctant to speak up about it. This is why the world comes together on 28 May, every year, to mark Menstrual Hygiene Day – to raise awareness on the challenges women and girls face due to menstruation, and to highlight solutions to address these challenges.

According to a UNICEF and WaterAid study, 60% of parents in Sri Lanka do not allow their daughters to go to school during their period, and 80% of teachers think that bathing should be avoided during menstruation. Such taboos and misinformation affect the menstrual hygiene of women and girls, and undermine gender equality. It leads to discrimination, causing women and girls to miss out on their education, work and other opportunities in life.

Identifying the need to increase awareness on menstrual hygiene and to break the stigma around menstruation, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in Sri Lanka marked Menstrual Hygiene Day by running a quiz competition on its social media channels. Winners received passes to watch the Bollywood film ‘Pad Man’, at a special screening held on 28 May 2018.

‘Pad Man’ is a film based on the inspiring life story of Arunchalam Muruganatham, an Indian man who revolutionised the concept of menstrual hygiene by manufacturing low-cost sanitary napkins in India, upon learning that his wife used filthy rags and newspapers during her periods. The film explores many important aspects such as gender stereotypes and challenges the social stigma around menstruation.

Speaking at the event, UNFPA Sri Lanka Representative, Ritsu Nacken said; “The social stigma associated with menstruation can undermine gender equality. By having open dialogues about menstruation we can promote healthy attitudes and safer practices in hygiene and sanitation. It is important to recognise that menstruation matters not only to women and girls, but also to men and boys. Including men and boys in conversations about menstruation will help create normalcy and foster a safe and supportive environment for women and girls”.

At the event, over 100 young people also had the opportunity to learn about three eco-friendly menstrual hygienic products: 1) Candra – a reusable undergarment manufactured by Sri Lankan apparel company Hela Clothing, 2) Me Luna – Menstrual Cups produced in Germany, and 3) Momiji Natural – a reusable cloth-based sanitary napkin locally produced by a female Japanese entrepreneur.


Share This Article


DISCLAIMER:

1. All comments will be moderated by the Daily FT Web Editor.

2. Comments that are abusive, obscene, incendiary, defamatory or irrelevant will not be published.

3. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.

4. Kindly use a genuine email ID and provide your name.

5. Spamming the comments section under different user names may result in being blacklisted.

COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

Warriors who fight for a larger purpose

Friday, 17 August 2018

Are women more naturally inclined to cooperation than men? Sulochana Sigera’s impassioned statement at last week’s Women in Management Awards seemed to suggest so. Addressing the under-representation of women decision-makers, Sigera pointed to th


Do we sink or swim? No Michael, row the boat ashore!

Friday, 17 August 2018

Why Sri Lanka needs to strengthen geopolitical ties to be a competitive global economy by 2030


Sri Lankan people want leaders to be decisive

Friday, 17 August 2018

The different leaders we have seen in Sri Lanka in the last 40 years beginning with JRJ to the current President were very different in their approach to power and authority, based on their cultural values and understandings of the leadership style.


The strategic role of the finance function: The path to relevance

Thursday, 16 August 2018

During my term as Global President of CIMA nearly a decade ago, the theme I chose for my year of leadership was a single word – ‘relevance’. The word relevance is perpetual. It is contextual to when it is used. It is extremely applicable to the


Columnists More