Home / Healthcare/ Surgical infections in low-income countries linked to drug-resistant bugs: Study

Surgical infections in low-income countries linked to drug-resistant bugs: Study


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Tuesday, 20 February 2018 00:00


 

Patients having surgery in low-income countries are more likely to develop an infection than those in wealthier nations, which may be linked to drug-resistant bacteria – according to a new study. 

There is also a higher antibiotic use among patients in low-income nations and they are more likely to be infected with bacteria that are resistant to medicines. 

Research led by the Universities of Birmingham, Edinburgh and Warwick sheds light on a link between antibiotic use and infection and highlights an urgent need to tackle surgical infection in low-income nations, scientists say. 

Infection at the site of a surgical wound is a complication that prolongs recovery times for patients and can be fatal. Until now, the extent of the problem in low-income countries was unknown. 

To address this, researchers looked at hospital records – from 66 low, middle and high income countries – for more than 12,000 patients undergoing surgery on the digestive system. 

Patients in low-income countries were 60% more likely to have an infection in the weeks following an operation compared with high and middle income countries. 

Those who developed a wound infection were more likely to die, although the infection was not necessarily the cause of death. Infected patients were also found to stay in hospital three times longer. 

Drug-resistant bacteria do not respond to antibiotics, making it hard to treat infection. Their spread has been linked to overuse of antibiotics and is an urgent global healthcare challenge. 

The research forms part of GlobalSurg Collaborative, an international network of doctors who gather healthcare data by recruiting healthcare centres through social media. 

It is published in Lancet Infectious Diseases and was funded by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR). 

Professor Dion Morton, of the University of Birmingham’s Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences, said: “Countries with a low Human Development Index carry a disproportionately greater burden of surgical infections than countries with a middle or high Human Development Index.

“In view of World Health Organisation recommendations on measures for surgical site infection prevention that highlight the absence of high-quality evidence for interventional research, urgent, pragmatic, randomised trials are needed to assess measures aiming to reduce this preventable complication.” 

Dr. Ewen Harrison, Clinical Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant Surgeon at the University of Edinburgh, who led the research said: “Our study shows that low income countries carry a disproportionately high burden of infections linked to surgery. 

“We have also identified a potential link between these infections and antibiotic resistance. This is a major healthcare concern worldwide and this link should be investigated further.” 

 


Share This Article


DISCLAIMER:

1. All comments will be moderated by the Daily FT Web Editor.

2. Comments that are abusive, obscene, incendiary, defamatory or irrelevant will not be published.

3. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.

4. Kindly use a genuine email ID and provide your name.

5. Spamming the comments section under different user names may result in being blacklisted.

COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

In the desert of Tamil films, actor Sivaji Ganesan was an oasis

Saturday, 22 September 2018

‘Indian Film,’ first published in 1963 and co-authored by former Columbia University Professor Erik Barnouw and his student Dr. Subrahmanyam Krishnaswamy, is considered a seminal study of the evolution and growth of Indian cinema. The book is cit


Imran may turn blind eye to blasphemy law and persecution of Ahmadiyyas

Saturday, 22 September 2018

There are clear signs that Pakistan’s freshly minted Prime Minister, Imran Khan, will make a sincere effort to reduce corruption and maladministration in the domestic sphere. In foreign affairs he is likely to make a brave attempt to mend fences wi


The rate of exchange, capital flight and the Central Bank

Friday, 21 September 2018

The Central Bank (CBSL) exists for the sole purpose of price stability. Its controls on the financial system and monetary policy exist to maintain price stability. As put forth many times by the Governor, the failing of the CBSL to control inflation


Red flag over the Sri Lankan Navy

Friday, 21 September 2018

Shocking story Rusiripala, a former banker in Sri Lanka, who has taken to writing in Daily FT, is perturbed by the red flag I have raised (Daily FT article 18 September) over the shocking charge that our Navy had operated a ransom gang that had abduc


Columnists More