Home / Healthcare/ Minimally invasive treatment for cancer with Microwave Ablation at Durdans Hospital

Minimally invasive treatment for cancer with Microwave Ablation at Durdans Hospital


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Monday, 30 July 2018 00:00


In Sri Lanka the risk of developing any of the leading cancers in one’s lifetime, for both males and females, is one out of 40. While different types of treatment are available they can diminish the quality of life for the patient. Along with the early detection of tumours, Microwave Ablation is a minimally invasive procedure that can be performed to remove a tumour or mass anywhere in the body. 

Durdans Hospital Radiology Department facilitates minimally invasive Microwave Ablation for patients with cancer or any kind of mass, in a state of the art facility under the guidance of experienced specialists. Radiology facilities include CT, MRI, Digital X-ray, ultrasound, bone densitometry and digital mammography. 

Microwave Ablation is used successfully to treat liver, kidney, lung, breast and prostate cancers among others. As this is not a surgical procedure there is no down time or blood loss and the risk of infection or post-op complication isvery low. Also it can be performed as an outpatient procedure. 

Durdans Hospital Consultant Interventional Radiologist Dr. Prasad De Silva says, “Areas up to 5cm in diameter can be burned and take as little as five minutes to complete the ablation. A needle will be inserted through the skin into the mass or tumour and when connected to a microwave generator the electrode in the needle creates high frequency microwave energy to heat and destroy the tumour tissue.”

Dr. Silva also says, “The needle is guided with the help of CT and Ultrasound scans so that we can find the exact location. The microwave heat burns only the mass and not the surrounding healthy tissue. The patient will be put under local anaesthesia and will be sedated as they may feel a degree of pain and soreness after the ablation.” 

Ablation means to burn. Microwave Ablation is the process by which electromagnetic energy is used at microwave frequencies of typically 915 MHz or 2.45 GHz (for ablative technologies) to heat the tissues of the organ bearing the tumour.The procedure is very short, fast and highly accurate.

 


Share This Article

Facebook Twitter


DISCLAIMER:

1. All comments will be moderated by the Daily FT Web Editor.

2. Comments that are abusive, obscene, incendiary, defamatory or irrelevant will not be published.

3. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.

4. Kindly use a genuine email ID and provide your name.

5. Spamming the comments section under different user names may result in being blacklisted.

COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

Economic growth through fragmentation and global value chain

Wednesday, 19 February 2020

The global value chain will continue to enhance economic growth, create better job opportunities and shrink poverty in developing countries. As far back as the 1990s, through international trade, global value chain benefits were experienced by poorer


Sri Lankan housewife in trouble again?

Wednesday, 19 February 2020

After almost six quarters of negative growth, starting from Quarter 1 2016, Sri Lanka saw overall general trading conditions recovering to register +4.1% GDP growth in Q1-2019 and +3.7% in Q2-2019 which was a welcome sign to a typical Sri Lanka hous


Their investigations and our investigations

Wednesday, 19 February 2020

There must be very few subjects in this country more investigated than the alleged wrongdoings in relation to Government issued bonds. Beginning with the so-called Pilipino committee (appointed by persons whose very conduct was germane to the inquir


Education and vocational training: lessons learnt from Singapore

Wednesday, 19 February 2020

In the 1960s, Lee Kuan Yew, the eminent leader and founding father of Singapore, once said that he wants to build Singapore as Sri Lanka. But what has happened today? Sri Lanka is lagging behind Singapore in many aspects. Singapore has no natural res


Columnists More