Home / FT View/ Getting the numbers right

Getting the numbers right


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Thursday, 7 December 2017 00:00


Hundreds of thousands of students are busy getting ready for their Ordinary Level exams but on average only about 55% will pass mathematics. 

This is especially alarming given that passing O/Ls remains a prerequisite for most further education courses currently available in Sri Lanka including the GCE Advanced Level. 

According to research carried out by the Institute of Policy Studies (IPS) recently, the lack of qualified and experienced teachers is particularly prevalent in the areas of science and mathematics.

Though Sri Lanka has a surplus of teachers at the national level, IPS points out in its findings that there is a dearth in qualified and experienced teachers at both the national and sub-national levels, especially for the subjects of mathematics, science and English (in that order), in schools across the country.

Considering the Government is focused on improving STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education at the university level, it goes without saying that schoolchildren, particularly at the all-important O/L juncture, ought to receive a sound foundation in these field-relevant subjects if those students are to pursue higher studies in the STEM fields. 

The IPS has correctly called for urgent attention on improving science and mathematics education at the school level with this goal in mind. Any education reforms that may be on the cards then must prioritise advanced teacher training, particularly for these highly technical subjects, if the Government is serious about its goal of improving STEM education at the tertiary level.

Tertiary level teacher training in Sri Lanka, experts point out, does not cater to the needs of the country’s education system, what with only two out of the 17 state universities housing Faculties of Education and only three with their own Departments of Education. This is an area the Ministry of Education needs to look into when formulating plans for reform.

Another problem that has plagued the public school system for decades is the disparity between ‘big’ schools and ‘small’ schools. Unsurprisingly, the study has shown that the lack of qualified teachers is particularly prevalent in the latter. The number of teachers in privileged schools, according to IPS, exceeds the number of recommended teachers, while underprivileged and low-achieving schools did not have enough teachers, leading to an inequitable allocation of teachers. O/L performance is significantly lower in schools that don’t offer science subjects for the Advanced Level and schools that terminate at Grade 5 or Grade 8.

There is also a large shortage of qualified teachers (both novice and experienced) for mathematics and science that is apparent in all provincial schools. According to IPS, shortages of English teachers exist in the Northern, Eastern, North Central, Uva and Sabaragamuwa provinces.

It is clear that this shortage of teachers has led to a frustrating status quo that does not bode well for the country’s future. It is time those tasked with reforming the education system take this reality into account and take immediate steps to train teachers, both in their relevant subjects and in teaching those subjects. A system also needs to be worked out to make sure good teachers stay in periphery schools and efforts should be made to recognise teachers who go beyond the call of duty.


Share This Article


COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

Spotlight on Franco-German Human Rights Award winner, Sri Lanka’s Shreen Saroor

Saturday, 16 December 2017

Noted Sri Lankan human rights campaigner Shreen Abdul Saroor received the Franco-German Human Rights Award at a ceremony on Monday in the presence of Minister of Finance and Media Mangala Samaraweera and the German Ambassador to Sri Lanka Jörn Rohde


Thoughts on the Budget and what comes next

Friday, 15 December 2017

The recent Budget definitely improves on previous budgets. It is a promising debut for Mangala Samaraweera, the new Finance Minister. He sees...


2017 a decisive year; what’s in store for 2018?

Friday, 15 December 2017

‘Creating a Shared Future in a Fractured World’ is be the goal of the World Bank and the IMF in 2018. In the last 12 months the global...


Call to probe Lanka’s trade with Singapore and UAE for black money transactions

Friday, 15 December 2017

Sri Lankan economist Dr. Muttukrishna Sarvananthan has called for a probe into the financing of the substantial trade between Sri Lanka and countries like Singapore and the UAE, to check possible black money transactions


Columnists More