Home / Fashion/ Meghan loved her veil embroidered with tribute to the Commonwealth - designer

Meghan loved her veil embroidered with tribute to the Commonwealth - designer


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Wednesday, 23 May 2018 00:00


LONDON  (Reuters) - When Meghan Markle walked down the aisle to marry Prince Harry on Saturday, she had with her the 53 countries of the Commonwealth - each one represented in the embroidery of her veil.

Recounting the discussions over Meghan’s dress and veil for Saturday’s groundbreaking wedding, designer Clare Waight Keller said the new Duchess of Sussex had welcomed the idea that her veil could be designed to hold extra significance.

“The veil was a huge part of the conversations that we had early on. We talked about what we wanted to do in terms of trying to embrace some of the royal connections in there,” said Waight Keller, who became the first female artistic director at famed French house Givenchy last year.

“And a lot of the work that she’s going to probably do in the future is going to be connected to the Commonwealth ... and I said ‘wouldn’t it be amazing if we took the 53 countries of the Commonwealth and embroidered a flower and some flora and fauna from each one of those and that they would go up the aisle, that journey up the aisle with you’.”

Keller said Meghan loved the idea of “all of those countries walking with her through the ceremony.”

Just last month, her now husband, Prince Harry, was appointed to his highest-profile public role to date as youth ambassador to the Commonwealth, the 53 nations bound together by the shared history of the now-defunct British Empire.

Those working on the hand-drawn veil spent hundreds of hours sewing the design, and had to keep washing their hands to keep the tulle and threads pristine.

Meghan’s choice of a sleek sculpted dress, and the five-metre long veil and sparkling diamond tiara, was praised by fashion experts.

Waight Keller said Harry had thanked her for her role in making his wife look “absolutely stunning” after the ceremony at the 15th-century St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle, which was watched by royals and celebrities up close, with millions of others tuning into television coverage.

“I saw her after the service. She was absolutely radiant,” said Waight Keller. “There was just a glow to her, you could tell they were so in love ... and she had just looked absolutely exquisite.”


Share This Article


DISCLAIMER:

1. All comments will be moderated by the Daily FT Web Editor.

2. Comments that are abusive, obscene, incendiary, defamatory or irrelevant will not be published.

3. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.

4. Kindly use a genuine email ID and provide your name.

5. Spamming the comments section under different user names may result in being blacklisted.

COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

Reinvent yourself before reinventing your industry

Tuesday, 23 October 2018

For the last 19 years Interbrand has been carrying out its Best Global Brands report. This year, the theme of the study is ‘Activating Brave’, which examines the role that brand strength plays in the transformation of the world’s leading busi


Virtual banks: Opportunities and challenges

Tuesday, 23 October 2018

A virtual bank is a bank which predominantly delivers retail banking services through the internet or other forms of electronic channels instead of physical branches. This covers all online transactions whether it be via the web, email, mobile check


Value of regulated landfills: Megapolis Ministry must communicate

Tuesday, 23 October 2018

Our policymakers may do the right thing but not do it too well by not communicating the larger purpose of their actions. The current fuss about the proposed Aruwakkalu landfill is one such example. As the Ministry of Megapolis correctly points out,


IPS’s State of the Economy Report 2018 is a demonstration of its independent analysis of the economy

Monday, 22 October 2018

Economists are at the receiving end of society today when it comes to economic crises. They have been blamed not only for giving confusing advice, but also for failing to predict accurately the oncoming economic catastrophes.


Columnists More