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Will India invade or inspire IT?


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  • Bi-latUntitled-13411eral trade agreements must be strategically justified and then evaluated on their mutual benefits, considering all relevant socio-economic factors.
  • The Indian ITES industry, globally competitive with world class operators, is  almost double the size of the Sri Lankan economy. Can we not learn from it?
  • The world’s top business hubs, be it Dubai, Singapore, Hong Kong, London or New York, have grown with the help of the migrant workforce.
  • The backbone of the Sri Lankan economy is critically dependent on our own work force working outside the country.
  • To compete in ITES, physical in-country presence is not essential! Geography is history and distance is dead!

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