Home / Travel / Tourism/ See Venice, but pay an entry fee first

See Venice, but pay an entry fee first


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Wednesday, 2 January 2019 00:00

Facebook

 


ROME, AFP: Visitors to Venice will have to pay a new tax to help cover the costs of keeping the tourist-thronged historic city clean and safe, city officials have announced. 

The measure, passed late on Saturday as part of the budget bill, allows the city authorities from July to being charging tourists a landing fee of between 2.5 and 10 euros ($2.9-11.5) depending on the season. 

The charge covers all visitors, whether they are staying overnight or not. 

That means it will apply to day-trippers such as the thousands of cruise ship passengers who currently escape the existing tax charged by hotels and the owners of rented properties for those staying overnight. 

Some 600 cruise ships stop at Venice every year, helping drive complaints that the city is being swamped by the millions of tourists who visit each year. 

Airlines and coach companies may also pass on the new tax in their charges. 

City officials estimate that the tax could bring in 50 million euros ($55 million) a year. 

“The cost of cleaning the historic centre and its security are particular and for years have been covered by Venetians,” the centre-right mayor of Venice, Luigi Brugnaro, told daily La Repubblica. 

“Thank you to all those who from now on will help us keep Venice clean and allow Venetians to live more comfortably.” On Twitter, Brugnaro added that the authorities were looking at measures to ensure visitors working or studying in the city were not affected. 

A similar landing tax is already in place on the Aeolian isles off Sicily, and Lampedusa, Italy’s southernmost island.


Share This Article

Facebook Twitter


DISCLAIMER:

1. All comments will be moderated by the Daily FT Web Editor.

2. Comments that are abusive, obscene, incendiary, defamatory or irrelevant will not be published.

3. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.

4. Kindly use a genuine email ID and provide your name.

5. Spamming the comments section under different user names may result in being blacklisted.

COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

A case for reviewing plantation management

Thursday, 23 May 2019

Last week, I elaborated on ‘Going Beyond Agronomic Research for Plantation Reform’ with the aim of beginning a conversation on the importance of non-agronomic research to understand the many problematic areas that plague the plantation sector, in


How are we doing in e-government?

Thursday, 23 May 2019

It is customary to assess some aspect of the performance of a country using a composite index such as the Ease of Doing Business Index or the Network Readiness Index. For government services, there is the e-Government Development Index (EGDI), issued


National introspection in the aftermath

Thursday, 23 May 2019

“The immediate task for the Government is to guaranty the safety and security of all innocent Muslims and prevent a recurrence of 1983 … One cannot eradicate one evil with another” – Anatomy of an Islamist Infamy (III), CT, 9 May. In this, th


Dhammika Perera an anti-establishment candidate

Thursday, 23 May 2019

During the holy Vesak weekend the phones were buzzing all over Sri Lanka over a story that appeared on a web page. The story said that Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe had met with business tycoon Dhammika Perera whose business empire contribute


Columnists More