Home / FT View/ A whole new tech game

A whole new tech game


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Tuesday, 5 September 2017 00:00


Cheating at exams is as old as exams itself, but the use of technology has changed the playing field. A student sitting for the Advanced Level chemistry paper has been slapped with a lifetime ban on State exams, essentially ending his formal education, after he leaked the paper during the exam. But as technology adapts faster, how can Sri Lanka’s education authorities tackle these challenges? 

Media reports say the student was equipped with a camera hidden in his shirt, which snapped photos of the questions and automatically sent them to his home computer. His father, a dentist, had then sent these photos to a tuition master. They were printed and the fliers were handed out to students outside a popular school in Gampaha. All this barely took three hours and highlights the swiftness with which technology can invade and change the rules. 

The equipment was purchased by the student’s father using his credit card, according to reports. Investigations had also revealed the student had used the gadget to cheat during his biology paper and possible other subjects before he was eventually caught. Tough action taken by the Examinations Commissioner General in issuing a lifetime ban is clearly to discourage any other inventive people from getting similar ideas but is this enough? For as long as people think the risk is worth it they will continue to push the boundaries and better tech may just help them get away with cheating. 

This is not just a trend seen in Sri Lanka. A growing number of UK university students are cheating in exams with the help of technological devices such as mobile phones, smart watches and hidden earpieces. 

Data obtained by the Guardian newspaper found a 42% rise in cheating cases involving technology over the last four years – from 148 in 2012 to 210 in 2016. Last year, a quarter of all students caught cheating used electronic devices. Experts say the true figure is likely to be much higher because the high level of sophistication in gadgets students can get their hands on – such as mini cameras and micro earbuds – means not all cheats will be caught. 

At least 17 students were caught cheating with smart watches over the period examined, and cases of students using hidden earpieces or miniature cameras were reported at multiple universities. Some universities reported no cases of cheating over the four years, which one expert said was “highly unlikely”. This simply meant no one had caught the cheaters. 

eBay and other shopping websites offer numerous options for potential cheaters. Companies such as Monorean openly advertise as online stores to buy invisible earpieces for cheating in exams. Students who have grown up with smart phones and other tech or are simply tired of the unimaginative “learn by rote” system used in most education systems have no qualms about using what is right at their fingertips. 

Imposing lifetime exam bans are one way but another is also to set less predictable exam papers. Most cheating is detected in papers that require numbers such as economics and science subjects and these will be the hardest to guard. What is inescapable is the need for the authorities to step up their vigilance and adapt new systems because they can rest assured that tech is learning faster than they are.


Share This Article


COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

Bringing beedi into tax net can yield Rs. 40 b in revenue

Tuesday, 24 October 2017

Last week, the Financial Times quoted an AFP article that stated Sri Lanka will start regulating the toddy industry to boost tax revenues from the informal sector. This same principle should be applied to the beedi trade, which has also grown unabate


Grade 5 Scholarship examination and the future of the country

Tuesday, 24 October 2017

The Grade 5 scholarship examination results have been released recently. Although this is known as the “Mothers’ exam,” the mentality of the children can be well articulated when children come from the examination halls after the exams. Today w


Need for tax reforms: Government should not lose it this time but go for them early

Monday, 23 October 2017

In the first economic policy statement, Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe made a number of pledges related to taxes and tax reforms. One was that the Government would review whether the tax concessions given to investors have really delivered the e


Lessons from Geneva

Saturday, 21 October 2017

‘Mission Impossible – Geneva’ is an inspiring account of developments at the Human Rights Council in Geneva when Dayan Jayatilleka was our Permanent Representative there. It is written by his wife Sanja, which provides for fascinating insights


Columnists More