Home / Columnists/ Should the BOI be shut down?

Should the BOI be shut down?


Comments / {{hitsCtrl.values.hits}} Views / Friday, 28 July 2017 00:10


01Justice Minister Dr. Wijeyadasa Rajapakshe very boldly stated at the Sri Lanka Economic Summit on Wednesday that the Board of Investment should be shut down. The BOI is the PM’s brainchild and an offshoot of the GCEC. 

Wijeyadasa went on to say the one-stop-shop has now become a ‘one more stop’ and is destroying the economy. It may sound very harsh, but that is very much the reality. It has outlived its true purpose and no longer connects with our economic needs of our country, other than putting more barriers for FDI and costing the taxpayer more and more money. 

The proposed Agency for Development once enacted should hopefully pave the way to radicalise the way we attract FDI into the country and hopefully pave the way for the BOI to be absorbed into the agency. 

Sri Lanka no longer looks more attractive than some of the other FDI destinations in the region because they have now all caught up with Sri Lanka. The Board of Investment of Sri Lanka was set up in 1992 to showcase our comparative advantages over the other countries and to attract significant amounts of FDI, increase employment opportunity for our youth and to drive up our exports. 

Today to successfully promote our skill sets and national resources in exchange for FDI, requires significant investment from Government in knowledge management, building skills and also leadership to develop new industries and exploit our current or potential comparative advantages. We have so far hardly addressed any of these issues other than at talk shows or on paper. 

The BOI to be effective needs to have well-established links to education and industry skills, policymaking and technology development to make a meaningful contribution to the progress of the country. The lack of genuine measurable success is highlighted by the limited amount of real growth in FDI in the last three years.

Significant driver02

For a cash-strapped economy like Sri Lanka, foreign investment is a significant driver of economic development. FDI fills the savings-investment gap and enhances investment and economic growth. FDI contributes to improving work ethics, discipline, skills and knowledge of workers. 

It is an important means of technology transfer and transmission of best practices in management and often brings with them international markets. It is the realisation of these economic benefits that has made former communist countries like China and Vietnam and the formerly inward-looking Indian economy actively seek foreign investment. For example, China attracted around $ 60 billion in 2015 and $ 66 billion in 2016, India around $63 billion and Vietnam around $23 billion.

Private sector development 

Despite the policy reforms introduced to facilitate private sector development, the private sector investment is constrained by several factors, which need urgent corrective action, especially the institutional set up. 

If Sri Lanka is to achieve 6% +growth, foreign investment has to increase to around 20% of GDP. In Sri Lanka, during periods of relative economic and political stability, foreign direct investment inflows have responded positively. 

Sri Lanka expects Foreign Direct Investment to quadruple to $4 billion by 2020. To achieve this we need new thinking, a new institution which has no baggage of the past and new leadership to position Sri Lanka for the future.

Sri Lanka is strategically placed to benefit from a fast changing global marketplace and trade routes.  We are between Europe and Far East on the major East-West shipping lanes. We have easy access to lucrative Middle Eastern markets and rising African markets, while the growth engine that is India lies just 20 miles away. 

However, if Sri Lanka is to attract any significant FDI, the investment promotion policies need to be complemented by appropriate policy changes with respect to education and skills development, R&D, regulation and leadership.



(The writer is a thought leader.)


Share This Article


DISCLAIMER:

1. All comments will be moderated by the Daily FT Web Editor.

2. Comments that are abusive, obscene, incendiary, defamatory or irrelevant will not be published.

3. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.

4. Kindly use a genuine email ID and provide your name.

5. Spamming the comments section under different user names may result in being blacklisted.

COMMENTS

Today's Columnists

DMK Chief “Kalaignar” Karunanidhi excelled as a Tamil film script writer

Saturday, 18 August 2018

Muttuvel Karunanidhi, known to the Tamil-speaking world as “Kalaignar” (artiste), passed away at the age of 94 in Chennai on 7 August. Karunanidhi had been Chief Minister of India’s Tamil Nadu state for a total of 19 years. He was Chief Ministe


Bangladesh could be a happy hunting ground for Lankan entrepreneurs

Saturday, 18 August 2018

Bangladesh has traditionally been hospitable to Sri Lankan entrepreneurs and fortunately, the traditional friendliness has not given way to arrogance with the country’s growing prosperity. This was acknowledged at a meeting of Sri Lankan entreprene


Warriors who fight for a larger purpose

Friday, 17 August 2018

Are women more naturally inclined to cooperation than men? Sulochana Sigera’s impassioned statement at last week’s Women in Management Awards seemed to suggest so. Addressing the under-representation of women decision-makers, Sigera pointed to th


Do we sink or swim? No Michael, row the boat ashore!

Friday, 17 August 2018

Why Sri Lanka needs to strengthen geopolitical ties to be a competitive global economy by 2030


Columnists More