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The social side of flexible working


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  • 91% of business people in Sri Lanka say flexible work allows them to get out and meet up with people more often

Flexible workers have a more active social life (91%), reveals the latest study commissioned by Regus, the flexible workspace provider. 

Workers report that being able to work closer to home at least some of the time helps them spend more time socialising and meeting people. The survey also found that flexible workers are more likely to shop locally and contribute more to the local economy (52%).

Regus commissioned research canvassing over 20,000 business people across the globe and found that flexible and closer-to-home working helps to create a sense of community in more ways than one; by benefitting local businesses, but also allowing people to get out and meet up with friends and family more often. Flexible working has become so important that fully 73% of workers in Sri Lanka say that any job they take nowadays should offer it.

Other key findings in Sri Lanka:

  • Working closer to home reportedly also makes for a healthier workforce with nearly half of respondents saying that cutting down the gruelling commute means they get more sleep (45%);
  • Almost two thirds also confirm that a shorter commute also contributes to helping them find time to eat more healthily (58%);
  • But flexible working can also offer some respite from annoying colleagues with 48% saying it means they don’t have to put up with colleagues’ unpleasant personal habits;
  • A third (36%) confirms working out of the main office some of the time helps them get away from boring colleagues.

Sri Lanka Regus Country Manager Kunal Bhatawadekar said: “Flexible working is recognised as a key element of staff retention and motivation, but the results clearly confirm that it plays a key role in helping workers decide whether they will even consider a job or not.

“While the health and morale benefits of flexible working are easily grasped, the study also reveals that allowing people to work closer to home at least some of the time can benefit local communities. Small businesses such as cafes and shops play a key role in building community spirit and risk closing if they are only frequented during the weekends. Thanks to flexible working these commercial activities experience a continued stream of business throughout the week.”

Regus is the world’s largest provider of flexible workspace solutions, with a network of 2,850 locations in over 1,000 towns and cities, across 107 countries, serving 2.3 million members.


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